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The First Year

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ELIZABETH NAVARRO
ELIZABETH NAVARRO

[S1E5] Learned Behaviour


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[S1E5] Learned Behaviour


Bad behaviour in the classroom is undermining learning and threatening several schools' results in the multi-academy Castle School Education Trust. Chief executive Will Roberts and his team decide to introduce Ready to Learn, a strict new behaviour management system. Disruptive students are isolated from their usual classmates in the separate, silent Ready to Learn room for entire school days if they fail to toe the line. At both Marlwood and Mangotsfield Schools, a small group of persistent repeat offenders continues to misbehave. Temporary exclusions are rising rapidly. The mission is to improve classroom conditions for the majority of students, boost the schools' overall results and work separately with those who are behaving badly and having difficulty learning.


Prevention starts with knowing your risk. Nine in ten Canadians have at least one risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Almost 80% of premature heart disease and stroke can be prevented through healthy behaviours. That means that habits like eating healthy, being active and living smoke free, have a big impact on your health.


DJ "Retchid Kat" performs at a rave. Meanwhile, music professor Paul Lawson is killed in his car when rats attack him. Nick (David Giuntoli) and Hank (Russell Hornsby) are sent to investigate and discover "Geiger Pest Control" cages hidden nearby, leading them to question if they brought the rats there. While questioning Lawson's students, they learn that one of Lawson's students, Roddy Geiger (Nick Thurston), had been suspended for bad behaviour. They question Roddy and his father, but the pair resist and are arrested. Nick finds out they are Reinigen. Sgt. Wu (Reggie Lee) finds out that Roddy is "Retchid Kat", and since he was at the rave the night Lawson died, he is released. An autopsy reveals that Lawson died from a heart attack before the rats could kill him.


It can be difficult for us to admit our mistakes, our vulnerabilities - and ultimately what we do that hurts those we love. Perhaps for some this is a learned behaviour; a subconscious but real fear that originated in childhood, where admitting fault would lend itself to being scolded, perhaps humiliated, and punished. If we are not self aware, then yes, we may not realize how our actions and words affect and hurt another. Or perhaps, as Michael revealed of his own behaviour, we often do realize when we have potentially said or done something that is hurtful, but avoid acknowledging and admitting this in the idealized hope that we are mistaken, or that we can avoid what would cause us to feel badly about our self.


Upon leaving her first therapy session with me, Tara went to speak with Michael. She later described how empowering it was to have 'found her voice' and the courage to speak her truth. Tara shared with Michael many examples of how he had been hurtful over the years, and explained why she had stopped talking about her feelings and what bothered her. Tara learned to hold back from expressing her sadness and hurt since (as she explained), it was repeatedly reciprocated with Michael's denial and hostility.


It was largely Tara's words spoken with complete openness and honesty that Michael came to realize that he allowed his ego to get in the way of being honest, kind, and vulnerable with the one person that had loved him unconditionally. Back in my office after that pivotal meeting with his wife, Michael admitted with remorse that he was finally ready to acknowledge the pattern of behaviour that reflected a lack of kindness, respect and love. As much as he had glimpses of the disrespectful and abusive way in which he conducted himself, Michael would still attempt to dismiss his behaviour, justifying his actions and unwilling to see himself as he was; with honesty and clarity.


I help clients to fix or change a problematic situation; often this is the result of how they are not able (or at times willing) to act with compassion and love; and ultimately to correct the behaviours that cause much suffering unto themselves. This change begins with awareness of the impact of one's words and actions onto their self, and others. When you awaken, you see your self with honesty and accuracy. Awakening highlights what thoughts or actions have contributed to your suffering. Being self-aware allows you to choose how you will be different; and what is needed in order to have better relationships, to improve your current life circumstances, and ultimately how you think and feel towards your self, others, and the world.


It's Founders Day at the college and all the old alumni are expected back. Angela briefs the students about the good behaviour that is expected of them and reveals a celebrity guest alumnus, Mr Crispin Hunter. News of his attendance causes a stir with Edmund as the two share a murky past.


Documentary series following the intimately connected experiences of pupils, teachers, parents and school leaders across an academic year, in all their complexity.\n\nMore public money is being spent on education than ever before, but financial pressures and the number of teachers quitting the profession continue to rise. The series unpicks the connections between key decisions and their human impact, right across the system. At stake is the future of Britain's next generation - what should we expect of our teachers, our children and ourselves\n\nBad behaviour in the classroom is undermining learning and threatening several schools' results in the multi-academy Castle School Education Trust. Chief executive Will Roberts and his team decide to introduce Ready to Learn, a strict new behaviour management system. Disruptive students are isolated from their usual classmates in the separate, silent Ready To Learn room for entire school days if they fail to toe the line. At both Marlwood and Mangotsfield Schools a small group of persistent repeat offenders continues to misbehave. Temporary exclusions are rising rapidly. The mission is to improve classroom conditions for the majority of students, boost the schools' overall results and work separately with those who are behaving badly and having difficulty learning.\n\n11-year-old Leo has a diagnosis of ADHD and is in his first year at Marlwood. Leo says he wants to behave well but doesn't always take his medication for his ADHD. After one incident in which Leo refuses to go to a lesson and runs away from teachers, Leo's mum is called in for a critical meeting with assistant head Stuart Emery.\n\nAt nearby Mangotsfield School, 16-year-old Joe is struggling with the new sanctions. He too has ADHD. Although he acknowledges the importance of getting qualifications he regularly falls foul of the Ready to Learn rules, spending a lot of time outside of mainstream lessons as his GCSEs fast approach. At this late stage, his place at Mangotsfield is under threat if he cannot learn to work within the rules.\n\nIn this programme the demand for better classroom discipline for all meets a desire to accommodate a minority of students who struggle to behave. What is good for the many isn't necessarily good for the few. The heads and their teams are on a quest to instil personal responsibility while balancing the effects of medical conditions that don't always allow children to choose how they behave. With a close eye on the exclusion rate, the fate of those students struggling to adapt to the new regime and calm classrooms for the majority of students, the Trust must decide whether the new Ready To Learn system is here to stay.\n\nSchool is a co-production with the Open University.\n\nSchool is set in three secondary schools: Marlwood, The Castle and Mangotsfield. Together they form part of Castle School Education Trust (CSET), a large multi-academy trust in south Gloucestershire, where their budgets and fortunes are intertwined. Each of the head teachers answers to trust CEO William Roberts, who retrained to be a teacher after starting his career at a multinational corporation. Two thirds of all secondary state schools in England have academy status. Academies are funded and managed independently of Local Education Authorities and are increasingly grouping together to form multi-academy trusts (MATs), each managed by a single board of directors and CEO. The number of MATs in England has tripled in the past five years.Source: BBC 2


The current situation of COVID-19 pandemic is the epitome of theoretical considerations about the world of VUCA, which is filled with variability, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity. It is a trial period for many paradigms of the classical school of economics based on known market mechanisms, where the invisible hand of the market will always and accurately find the balance. So it is for leadership models based on the alpha male archetype. An invincible leader who always sets the direction infallibly, accurately predicts the future and executes his brilliant plan flawlessly. It is also a brutal verification for business models based on traditional sales such as physical stores or predictable patterns of consumer behaviour. Perhaps a tectonic shift awaits the entire economic model, where globalisation based on long supply chains on several continents will be replaced by the production of smaller batches in the country where the consumer is located. It could also be the social movements fighting for minimalism or ecological awareness will accelerate. Certainly, the digital economy is gaining momentum, and according to the McKinsey report, 79% of companies are still in the early stages of digital transformation. The revolution will not miss the labour market, where the growing role of technology and significant progression of artificial intelligence will require a massive up-skilling. So the business game we used to know is about to change quite rapidly. 59ce067264






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