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Developmental Disability

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ELIZABETH NAVARRO
ELIZABETH NAVARRO

Best Time Of Year To Buy A Car Seat


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The car seat industry exists in a constant state of flux. Every year brings new innovations and technology that have to co-exist with each nation's regulations. Obviously you want the newest and safest engineering to surround your tiniest family members. With COVID having limited and delayed releases across all industries, we finally starting to see big and small brands alike releasing new and/or updated car seat models.


Nuna has released a slew of car seats in the last 2 years. Currently they have a whopping SIX versions of the Pipa infant car seat. It's too many, and creates riddles for a demographic of people already experiencing "pregnancy brain".


Historically, UPPAbaby is a brand that likes to re-release each product every calendar year. Two new infant car seats debuting in the fall of 2022 Marking the furthest into the year Uppa has ever debuted a new product.


Car seats and boosters provide protection for infants and children in a crash, yet car crashes are a leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 13. That's why it's so important to choose and use the right car seat correctly every time your child is in the car. Follow these important steps to choose the right seat, install it correctly and keep your child safe.


Infant-only seats fit newborns and smaller infants best. They are used only as rear-facing seats (this means the baby faces the back of the car). Infant-only seats are for babies from birth until they reach around 35 pounds (about 16 kilograms), depending on the model. You'll need to use another seat when the baby outgrows the seat.


Kids should stay rear-facing until at least 2 years old, and ideally to the limits of their convertible car seat. All of the car seats below are great for extended rear facing until at least 4 years old and will last most kids until 6 years (or beyond) forward facing:


Another store than might not immediately spring to mind when you think about car seats is Boots. However, last year the store offered up to 27% off top car seat brands like Maxi-Cosi and Silver Cross.


When reviewing car seats for Baby Gear Essentials, we always use the NHTSA crash test scores as part of our overall rating. The best performing car seats in terms of safety in our tests are the Chicco KeyFit 30 and the UPPAbaby MESA.


Did you know that infant car seats have an expiration date Because materials stretch and deteriorate over time, most car seats will expire within five to seven years. Always check the expiration date of a car seat before purchasing.


Each year, thousands of young children are killed or injured in car crashes. Proper use of car safety seats helps keep children safe. But, because so many different seats are on the market, many parents find this overwhelming.


All infants and toddlers should ride in a rear-facing seat until they reach the highest weight or height allowed by their car safety seat manufacturer. Most convertible seats have limits that will allow children to ride rear facing for 2 years or more.


All children whose weight or height exceeds the forward-facing limit for their car safety seat should use a belt-positioning booster seat until the vehicle seat belt fits properly, typically when they have reached 4 feet 9 inches in height and are 8 to 12 years of age. All children younger than 13 years should ride in the back seat.


When children are old enough and large enough for the vehicle seat belt to fit them correctly, they should always use lap and shoulder seat belts for the best protection. All children younger than 13 years should ride in the back seat.


Car safety seats may be installed with either the vehicle's seat belt or its LATCH (lower anchors and tethers for children) system. LATCH is an attachment system for car safety seats. Lower anchors can be used instead of the seat belt to install the seat, and many parents find them easier to use in some cars. The top tether should always be used with a forward-facing seat, whether you use the seat belt or lower anchors to secure it. The seat belt and LATCH systems are equally safe, so caregivers should use one or the other, whichever works best for them, for their car safety seat, and their vehicle. In general, caregivers should only use 1 of the 2 options unless the car safety seat and vehicle manufacturers say it is OK to use 2 systems at the same time.


Usually come with a base that can be left in the car. The seat clicks into and out of the base so you don't have to install the seat each time you use it. Parents can buy more than one base for additional vehicles.


It is best for children to ride in a seat with a harness as long as possible, at least to 4 years of age. If your child outgrows a seat before reaching 4 years of age, consider using a seat with a harness approved for higher weights and heights.


It's best to avoid this, especially if your vehicle has airbags in the front seat. All children younger than 13 years should ride in the back seat. If absolutely necessary, a child in a forward-facing seat with a harness may be the best choice to ride in front. Just be sure the vehicle seat is moved as far back away from the dashboard (and airbag) as possible.


Booster seats are for older children who have outgrown their forward-facing seats. All children whose weight or height exceeds the forward-facing limit for their car safety seat should use a belt-positioning booster seat until the vehicle seat belt fits properly, typically when they have reached 4 feet 9 inches in height and are 8 to 12 years of age. Most children will not fit in most vehicle seat belts without a booster until 10 to 12 years of age. All children younger than 13 years should ride in the back seat. Instructions that come with your car safety seat will tell you the height and weight limits for the seat. As a general guideline, a child has outgrown a forward-facing seat when any of the following situations is true:


Seat belts are made for adults. Children should stay in a booster seat until adult seat belts fit correctly, typically when children reach about 4 feet 9 inches in height and are 8 to 12 years of age. Most children will not fit in a seat belt alone until 10 to 12 years of age. When children are old enough and large enough to use the vehicle seat belt alone, they should always use lap and shoulder seat belts for the best protection. All children younger than 13 years should ride in the back seat.


No one seat is the "best" or "safest."The best seat is the one that fits your child's size, is correctly installed, fits well in your vehicle, and is used properly every time you drive.


Vehicles with no back seat or a back seat that is not made for passengers are not the best choice for traveling with small children; however, the airbag can be turned off in some of these vehicles if the front seat is needed for a child passenger. See your vehicle owner's manual for more information.


Make sure that everyone who transports your child uses the correct car safety seat or seat belt on every trip, every time. Being consistent with car safety seat use is good parenting, reduces fussing and complaints, and is safest for your child.


Although the AAP is not a testing or standard-setting organization, this article sets forth the AAP recommendations based on the peer-reviewed literature available at the time of its publication and sets forth some of the factors that parents should consider before selecting and using a car seat.


There are three basic types of car seats: rear facing, forward facing and booster. Then there are thousands of models to choose from for each type of seat. All seats have to meet the same federal car seat safety standards. And as your child grows, you may think they have outgrown their current seat or is big enough to sit forward-facing and that it's time to purchase the next seat. Whether your child should move to another seat, however, depends on their height and weight, not age. Always read the labels of your seats. There is a lot to consider. Let's break it down and look at the different types of car seats.


This infant car seat is for the youngest children. The harness moves with the child during a crash while protecting their neck and spinal cord. It's best to keep your child in a rear-facing seat until they are at least two years old, even if they are already in a convertible car seat, which is a seat that goes from rear facing to forward facing when your child is around two years old.


As with many products, the structural integrity may weaken over time due to exposure to a number of environmental factors, including extreme temperature change. If you cannot find the expiration date stamped on your car seat, you can call the manufacturer and provide them with the date of manufacture and model number, to determine the expiration date.


Another situation that will rule out using a secondhand seat is not knowing the history of the restraint. Specifically, has the restraint been involved in a crash Restraints are designed to perform one time in a crash situation.


When choosing a seat for your newborn, there are two paths you can choose from: either to use an infant carrier from approx. 0-1 year, followed by a toddler seat until approx. 4 years; or to use a 2-in-1 seat from 0 to approx. 4 years.


Safety is in our DNA. That's why the Clek Liing infant car seat includes innovative, best-in-class safety features like a metal load leg, which prevents rotation and absorbs energy in a collision, reducing crash forces by up to 40%.


Deciding on the right car seat and stroller combination for your baby can be overwhelming and time consuming. That's why we designed Liing to work with top brands like Baby Jogger, BabyZen, Bugaboo, Bumbleride, Silver Cross, Stokke, Thule and Uppababy, using the Maxi-Cosi car seat adapter made by each stroller brand.


Once your child is 2 years old, you'll need to purchase a seat for them. The FAA recommends that children under 40 pounds continue to use a car seat and that children over 40 pounds use the seat belt on the airplane seat. The AAP recommends that you continue to use a car seat on a plane for any child who uses one in a car. Once your child reaches the age that they use a booster seat in a car, they can switch to the airplane seat belt. 59ce067264






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